ACS Pink Ribbon Classic

2017 & 2018

Honorees

2018 Honorees

 Elena Tate

Elena Tate

In 2009, I was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). I was in the fourth grade and immediately began a long hard road of treatment. I underwent 29 months of chemotherapy, numerous hospital stays, tests, and setbacks. In August of 2011, I completed my treatment and was declared cancer-free. That victory was not a complete success, I relapsed in February of 2012. My second battle was even harder than my first one. The cancer was stubborn and was not responding to chemo. In July of 2012, my only option for survival was to become the first person in a clinical trial. This trial was designed specifically for ALL patients preparing to have a bone marrow transplant who were not yet in remission. I was the only person on the trial and it saved my life. I had chemo and 8 radiation treatments the week before my transplant. I had my bone marrow transplant on July 25th, 2012, and was declared cancer-free. This time the cancer was really gone, but the pain and journey were far from over. I had many complications and negative side-effects. Because of these difficulties, I was in the hospital for 66 days in isolation. I was not able to see my sister because she could bring in outside germs. This was again a very tough road, but I fought hard each day. Some days were more difficult than others and sometimes I was not motivated, but I continued to fight and at the end of the 66 days I was able to leave the hospital a survivor. I did have to stay in the Ronald McDonald house for a little while after because I had to stay close to the hospital in case I got a fever or anything happened, and I was in isolation for six months at my house because I had a weak immune system, but my family was now back together.

Having only had homebound school services for my entire eighth-grade year, I had a difficult transition into high school.  Slowly, I made new friends and became involved in theatre. My confidence grew and I was a freshman mentor for both junior and senior year, active in my theatre class for all four years of high school, and a part of my high school's Relay for Life Executive Board sophomore, junior and senior year. 

I am proud to say that through hard work, last year I graduated with honors from North Gwinnett High School and successfully completed my first year of college this May at Georgia Gwinnett College. Today, I enjoy hiking, volunteering, visiting the beach and Friday pizza and movie nights with my family. As a result of my life experiences, I have decided that I want to become a Child Life Specialist. I believe that my journey through cancer has equipped me to be able to walk alongside children and their families as they fight their own battles against cancer. 

 
 Stephen (Steve) Hamilton

Stephen (Steve) Hamilton

Born in San Diego, California on April 1st, 1946.  During my youth, many hours were spent enjoying the Beaches of Southern California. Drafted into the Army in 1966, two years were spent in Monterey at Ft. Ord and gave me the incentive to go back to school and get my degree at San Diego State University in Information Technology.   During my college days, I worked operating computers from 12:30 at night to 7:30 in the morning while completing a full college schedule.   When summer came, I would forego classes and following work, would spend my days sleeping and enjoying the beaches.   Following College, I spent the rest of my career in various positions selling high technology leasing and various hardware and software products.  At age 57, I was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer.  As Cancer showed up in only 1 of 10 biopsies of my prostate and less than 10%, it was surmised it was restricted to the Prostate.  I elected to have a radical Proctectomy and have my Prostate removed 8 days following detection.  The result, Cancer free! At age 71, in 2016, I detected a small Cylinder below my left eyebrow.  Biopsies and full body scans later it was determined it was Melanoma and was discovered I had four early stage tumors in my Body,.  Immunotherapy was the chosen treatment and I was given 4 treatments, 3 weeks apart.   End result, following another full body scan,  I received the magic words “CANCER FREE.”  While I still receive a lesser treatment every month for 2 years just as a precaution in case there is a small undetectable cell(s), the prognosis is I am Cancer free.  The miracle of modern advances fighting Cancer have proven amazing results and it is thanks to those who support research through fund raising efforts such as “The Pink Ribbon” the funding has made my success and those of countless others possible.  

 

2017 Honorees

  Schelly Tennant Marlatt   For as long as I can remember, I was well aware of breast cancer and the effects it has on those you love. My paternal grandmother had been diagnosed in 1973 with a recurrence in 1995. Because of her, I understood the importance of conducting my monthly self-exam and was diligent in doing so. If it hadn’t been for my grandmother losing her personal battle, I probably wouldn’t have given those self-exams a second thought and most likely wouldn’t be here today.   At 26 years old in 2000, single and a business professional, breast cancer was the farthest thing from my mind. I was ten feet tall and bulletproof, and as my Mom would say, “Burning my candle at both ends”, I was enjoying my twenties to the fullest. Breast cancer at such a young age was not a common occurrence. In fact, there was some reluctance by doctors to even perform a biopsy. On February 9th, they were as surprised as I with the diagnosis of Stage 1 Infiltrating Ductile Carcinoma. My journey for the next few months included a lumpectomy, four rounds of Adriamycin Cytoxan-the kind of chemo that if it seeped out of my IV, it’d burn a hole through my arm. That was followed by 35 radiation treatments and three years of Tamoxifen. My concerns of fertility were put to rest as I now have two very handsome and active sons who remind me that being a Mom is by far my most amazing accomplishment. This year I celebrate 17 years cancer free!   Sherry Tennant   As we celebrated Schelly's 16th year, I was surprised with a diagnosis as well. On a routine mammogram, a small tumor was found and after a biopsy, it was confirmed to be Stage 0, Grade 3 Ductile Carcinoma In Situ. It is certainly one of the most common types of breast cancer but nonetheless frightening. My course of treatment was a lumpectomy and radiation. With the advancements made in radiation therapy, I was a candidate for a shorter term therapy of 16 treatments. Never missing a tee time throughout my radiation therapy, I now celebrate one year cancer free.  We are indeed advocates and proof that early detection is the key. Never neglect to do your self-exam and GET THAT MAMMOGRAM! 

Schelly Tennant Marlatt

For as long as I can remember, I was well aware of breast cancer and the effects it has on those you love. My paternal grandmother had been diagnosed in 1973 with a recurrence in 1995. Because of her, I understood the importance of conducting my monthly self-exam and was diligent in doing so. If it hadn’t been for my grandmother losing her personal battle, I probably wouldn’t have given those self-exams a second thought and most likely wouldn’t be here today. 

At 26 years old in 2000, single and a business professional, breast cancer was the farthest thing from my mind. I was ten feet tall and bulletproof, and as my Mom would say, “Burning my candle at both ends”, I was enjoying my twenties to the fullest. Breast cancer at such a young age was not a common occurrence. In fact, there was some reluctance by doctors to even perform a biopsy. On February 9th, they were as surprised as I with the diagnosis of Stage 1 Infiltrating Ductile Carcinoma. My journey for the next few months included a lumpectomy, four rounds of Adriamycin Cytoxan-the kind of chemo that if it seeped out of my IV, it’d burn a hole through my arm. That was followed by 35 radiation treatments and three years of Tamoxifen. My concerns of fertility were put to rest as I now have two very handsome and active sons who remind me that being a Mom is by far my most amazing accomplishment. This year I celebrate 17 years cancer free!

Sherry Tennant

As we celebrated Schelly's 16th year, I was surprised with a diagnosis as well. On a routine mammogram, a small tumor was found and after a biopsy, it was confirmed to be Stage 0, Grade 3 Ductile Carcinoma In Situ. It is certainly one of the most common types of breast cancer but nonetheless frightening. My course of treatment was a lumpectomy and radiation. With the advancements made in radiation therapy, I was a candidate for a shorter term therapy of 16 treatments. Never missing a tee time throughout my radiation therapy, I now celebrate one year cancer free.

We are indeed advocates and proof that early detection is the key. Never neglect to do your self-exam and GET THAT MAMMOGRAM!